Modern engine control musings and Fixing a Figaro technology connextras

by autisticchiaNGMAI



Yep. It’s pretty much just that. Links to the Aging Wheels videos about this weird little car are down below;

Review:

Repairs:

Me driving the finest in East German engineering:

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Modern engine control musings and Fixing a Figaro

Modern engine control musings and Fixing a Figaro

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Modern engine control musings and Fixing a Figaro
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48 comments

Josh Wood 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

"People like to complain about how they don't make cars like they used to…"
Me thinking: "Yeah they haven't really made any good ones since the late 70s… "
“But people don't realize that they've been computerized since the late 70s"
😅😅

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Noah Miller 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

Yeah they put computers in cars in the late 70's early 80's but that doesn't mean the statement, "they don't make cars like they use to." any less true. I'm struggling to see if putting them in was the right choice. If I'm honest, I'd rather have an inefficient car that I can more easily fix myself as opposed to a car that runs pretty efficiently but I can't re-tune/fix myself. Everything is a case of "lose this but get this." I just wish they had continued to make purely mechanical engines that were also efficient.
Also an edit to add: One day the internal combustion engine will be a relic of the past. That day is not far away. I'm 26 and I'm sure that within my lifetime the combustion engine will die. We're nearly there now. Pretty much every car manufacturer has stopped designing new gasoline fueled engines and have turned towards refining hybrid engines and designing all electric car systems. These are truly the final days of the internal combustion engine. If you want one, buy one now before the newest combustion engines become a thing of the past.

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corrugateddesigner 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

Cannot understate the importance of this sensor. My ol Audi is missing some latches on the air cleaner box which sits next to a lil oil leak and the exhaust. Just cleaned the MAFS to very great effect. Thanks for reminding me!

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freddyzdead1 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

My 2 cents: look for a vacuum leak. Else perhaps throttle position sensor.

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TheTony1596 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

That thing looks like a spaceship compared to my 91 civic

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Devon Redekopp 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

My favorite part of listening to Alec talk is that it makes me realize that it's exactly how I talk about things that I'm capable of understanding but I don't (yet) fully understand.

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Daniel Liaw 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

i rather have pre obd2, i can play with it better, obd 2 easy dignose but can't play as fun at cheap price

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Johnny Nimble 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

Huh. It’s been a year already. I know I am getting old because time is moving faster.

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Indy509 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

Easiest way to test the maf… unplug it. Does the engine run better? Then the sensor is faulty. No change or worse? Plug it back in and look elsewhere

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Ian Pattison 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

My parents had an '83 Mercury that had some onboard computer control, although it was pre-fuel injection.

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Colin Sipherd 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

I love the car but I couldn't help but cringe when the shifter was revealed https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=afrWCNoJkjY&t=1048s

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Shawn 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

Those problems are almost always caused by an idle air control valve. My 93 Accord did that. My old Saturn does that sometimes too. Neither of those cars use mass air flow sensors, and neither does my 2005 Accord. I try to avoid cars that use them because for a number of reasons. They easily get dirty and throw codes. They can be crazy expensive. They obstruct air flow.

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Thrall Dumehammer 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

1975 up, electronic engine controls. 1974 down, mechanical controls

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erg0centric 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

Just gonna throw it out there, and I don't know how it passed emissions limits:

My 1986 Nissan Sentra did not have a computer, older Datsuns did, new Nissan's did, but not that year. Just an ignition module inside the bottom of the distributer.

At least I never found a computer.

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Fernando Garcia 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

He looks like just the sort of person who would drive one of these or a Pao, or maybe an S-cargo. That entire line of vehicles is just quirky and niche enough for someone with a channel like this.

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Ryan Diederich 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

Car that old should have a damper/door on the air intake, to allow hot air to be taken in from around the hot exhaust area, there should be a temp sensor on the air intake before the filter, and the door should be there as well. Just my two cents based on an 84/86 honda civic

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Coltrinculo 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

Don’t you live in Midwestern US? Why is that a right sided driver’s seat?

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Brynjard Øvergård 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

A good ol' carburetor also does very basic (and very inaccurate, unreliable and insensitive) air flow sensing, save your rambling 'til you have to make an old engine run well in all conditions.

There's a reason we use electronics, and it's not because it's cheaper nor the simplest solution (system wise, it is a lot simple mechanically).

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AWMAISTER 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

intake air temp sensore could do that but most likely a vacuum leak, spray som engine starter around the vacuam lines if it changes the idle then you've found the leak:)

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Surestick88 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

I've never understood why they continue to use MAF over MAP. It's not like accurate air/fuel can't be controlled well with an O2 sensor and you never hear about MAP sensors going bad but everyone seems to have issues with dirty MAF sensors. Given that most people probably drive around with a dirty MAF for some time until they fix it there has to be some extra pollution due to this.

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Petter Kanto 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

More car tech PLEASE! For example, a video on mechanical fuelinjection would be super interesting!

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Nicholas Willig 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

For a new challenge..make it electric!!

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The Town Drunk 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

I’m old enough that I can legitimately say I remember an all mechanical car. I had a 74’ F-100. Best truck ever.

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Nolan Hayden 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

Aw c’mon, test don’t guess! (Says the person who’s multiple times been waist-deep in wiring before checking the fuses)

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Mister S 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

I had a 1971 Ford Custom 500 (Like Movie White Lightning) it had points and condenser…no solid state electronics EXCEPT in the radio.

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Adam Lawson 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

That code can pop up easily when working on the car. If the computer detects something disconnected it will throw it. I remove the battery now to avoid this, but it's common not to when doing small repairs like this.

Your experience of closed loop running like crap because of an input is sound as well. The error code throws it out of closed loop and it will feel better (but of course at the expense of efficiency etc).

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Adam Lawson 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

You're on the right track… vacuum leaks etc too.

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Adam Lawson 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

That is in great shape under the bonnet.

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nbarrager Productions 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

Alec I've never owned a car with a battery hold down. You'll be fine man…

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andrew allen 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

There are electronics and a computer in my fuel injected Mercedes w110 200d.
They are solely in the radio.

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Andrew Last 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

similar problem on skyline 350 gt turned out to be throttle body being sticky and lubrication fixed the problem

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Advanced Knowledge 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

i don’t think you fixed anything, wasting time to watch this, at the end of the video your figaro still have a bad start wth

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slawdify 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

Hold up. How can you just talk about those code LEDs and not show it??

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DeadNeck90 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

You gonna take us with you for a drive soon my good Sir?

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Kevin Yancey 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

Dude, there are simple steps to determine what's wrong with your car. And, if it's idling high all the time, then that contributes to it's starting issue. Take a can of AZ brake cleaner and spray around the intake. Look for a change in idle as you spray each location, to find air leaks. If you find nothing, then clamp off the house on that idle bypass when the engine is warm. If that doesn't correct they idle, then back out the throttle stop screw, that many people use incorrectly to set idle speed. It's purpose is to prevent the throttle butterfly from closing to the point of getting jammed or stuck. On older cars, vacuum lines break, allowing unregulated airflow into the intake, where vacuum is generated. Any smart mechanic could diagnose a high idle in minutes. Also, clean those injectors with a bottle of Techron fuel system cleaner.

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Kevin Yancey 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

No, it doesn't work the same as an idle air motor. It has a more mechanical function, like a bi-metal spring, that opens when cold and closes when warm. Usually, they have resistive heaters internally, that warm the spring over a few minutes, to lower the idle as the engine warms.

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tigrom01 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

I am silly too, so… fine

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Steve Haas 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

Figaro owner in Michigan here. I had the park safety switch issue and it’s a common issue but easy to fix. There is a cable connecting the shifter to the transmission. There are plastic bushings on each end where the ends attach. On mine these were brittle and cracked and one was even missing half… without these bushings the shifter simply isn’t moving the cable far enough to engage the switch.

Anyway, these are just a few bucks apiece and easy to install, especially if you have a hoist. 15 minutes and I had both of mine replaced.

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Josh Maresch 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

Audio on this one is super three dimensional.

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Randy Carter 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

Just saw the video. You've probably fixed it already. Surging is a sign of a vacuum leak. For 30 year old rubber hoses it's not surprising.

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Denton Fender 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

You sure keep it clean. Cool old car!

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no just no 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

It's pretty common for the cam position sensor to be in the distributor housing since in most cases the distributor is driven off of the cam rotation.

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D1k Ch33z 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

Where the cable connects to your throttle there is a screw to set the idle speed

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Allan Fulton 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

Have u never driven a car with a mechanical carburetor before. U have to pump the gas at start

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TommyMacDaddy1 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

Wow! Cool ride! Did you get it to run right? Had a similar computer control system in a 1990 240SX.
Worked on Chrysler Lean Burn engines (I think the first computer engine control) in 1978, and GM feedback carbs starting in 1982. Many others since then…I'm showing my age…ugh.
I think your IAC is fubar-d which would explain the surging(essentially a vacuum leak) and hard starting. That looks like a Bosch IAC, which has a small valve that closes a throttle bypass port when warm. It opens when cold to increase idle speed. Maybe…that's it. Just my $0.02 worth.

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Spike20101000 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

The distributor I had on a Mitsubishi (about the same age, more or less the same tech), looked like it was a straight bolt into the cams.
But when you took it apart, there was no solid connection. One side was a sensor for the cam, the other a motor.

It did alter the timing by rotation to suit, though as far as I am aware, it was more crude than the ignition packs we have now.
And basically knocked the whole sequence forward, or backward a few degrees relative to throttle position.

The throttle also had a direct wire, but again was split into a sensor, and motor. So the throttle was electric too.

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Phino K.M. 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

You're pretty close with the MAF. It actually consists of two filaments of a specific metal (used a themperature dependent resitors). Both are powered with a certain voltage and the current is monitored. The more air rushes in the more the wire is cooled down which changes the resistance which changes the current at a set voltage. The reason there are two is to compensate for the temperature of still air. One is in the "wind" and the other is in the wind shade. It uses the difference in current between the two to calculate the air flow and over time the air mass. In most cars with this system you actually don't control the throttle with the pedal, you only open and close an air flap. The further open the flap is the more air the engine gets. So essentially you control the airflow to the engine. The computer then calculates the amount of fuel needed and mixes it in.
And while many older cars are already computer controlled, not all are/were. I had a Nissan Sunny from I believe 1993, which was entirely mechanical. There was no computer at all. One of the few electronically controlled things was the RPM gauge. But even im that analog electronics were used. So it was technically not computer controlled.

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Christian Jull 20/12/2021 - 5:20 Chiều

As a past owner of a Japanese Domestic Market Nissan import (to Europe), I have to point out that you surrendered your right to complain about Japanese-language engine labelling, ICE, manuals, etc. as soon as you bought/imported it. If it was made for and sold in other markets (which it wasn't) then maybe. It's one of the joys of ownership. Like all the modifications required to make it road legal in a different country. But the reward is having a car most other people don't. 🙂

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