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Home » Class 1, Part 1: Economic Growth Theory and the Direct Elements in Innovation technology class 1 lessons

Class 1, Part 1: Economic Growth Theory and the Direct Elements in Innovation technology class 1 lessons



MIT STS.081 Innovation Systems for Science, Technology, Energy, Manufacturing, and Health, Spring 2017
Instructor: William B. Bonvillian
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Class 1 reviews two classic readings by Solow and Romer in economic growth theory and turns to a discussion of the innovation-related basis for growth in the 90’s. R&D funding and science and technology education levels are introduced.

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Class 1, Part 1: Economic Growth Theory and the Direct Elements in Innovation

Class 1, Part 1: Economic Growth Theory and the Direct Elements in Innovation

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Class 1, Part 1: Economic Growth Theory and the Direct Elements in Innovation
technology class 1 lessons
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12 thoughts on “Class 1, Part 1: Economic Growth Theory and the Direct Elements in Innovation technology class 1 lessons”

  1. 6:18 "Learning science" Hallelujah! Evidenced-based teaching. Well done. (After all you would expect a course on innovation to incorporate some degree of innovation itself). Very promising course with an (apparently) authentic instructor

  2. How do we kickstart American investment in Americans mining for American rare earth elements? Independence from China's monopoly being the goal. Thorium based nuclear reactors for a carbon reduced future, anyone?

  3. …so Bonvillian fought public transport? Cool, cool.

    It'd be funny how bourgeois economics still considers automation a threat to "jobs" (rather than something which reduces the human need for labour) if bourgeois ideology didn't run the entire world.

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